SFR 7: Interview – Becky De Acetis Shares Her Methods For 6X-ing Alex Charfen’s Funnel Performance – Stephen Larsen

SFR 7: Interview – Becky De Acetis Shares Her Methods For 6X-ing Alex Charfen’s Funnel Performance

Sep 10th, 2016 anchorwave

ClickFunnelsSteve Larsen:
All right. Hey, welcome everyone. Today I am super excited; I have a very special guest who’s very near and dear to me actually. I have been looking forward to this actually for several weeks; ever since we set it up. Everyone, this is Becky. Becky, say hi.

Becky:
Hi, everyone.

Steve Larsen:
Really though, Becky has been very influential to me, and I don’t know that I’ve told you this which makes me feel even worse, but I actually feel like you were very influential on me being in the position that I’m in right now.

Becky:
Oh, wow. Thank you.

Steve Larsen:
Yeah, absolutely. If it’s all right, I’d like to tell that story because it was a moment of high drama for me, you know what I mean? We always talking to people when they’re in a life transition period, and that’s kind of what I was in when you and I met. I was in college, obviously. I was about to graduate, literally the week before we met at Russel’s last event, the Funnel Hacker event. I was about to go over and work for this guy in Florida. I knew it would be good, but I wasn’t totally stoked. I remember at the event Russel had just pitched the whole certification event and I had a little prayer in my heart. I was like, “God, I feel like I should do this,” and then … I can’t even remember what I stopped by and asked you. Do you remember that?

Becky:
I think you just asked me about the certification and kind of what I had talked about. A few of the certification partners had talked a little bit about what I meant to me and I had mentioned that it really meant a lot to me to be able to be home with my kids and work with people who I believed in and who I [crosstalk [spp-timestamp time="00:02:20"] make a different.

Steve Larsen:
Yeah, absolutely. I must’ve had a freaked out look on my face or something like that because I remember the first thing you said to me is, “Do you just need to go talk?” I was like, “Sure, I guess I do.” I didn’t realize that I … I don’t know. Anyways, so we stepped out of the whole meeting and you started just answering questions for me and it was awesome and that led me to apply not just for certification, but to work at ClickFunnels, and that’s literally why I’m sitting in Russel’s office right now I think. It really … Everyone listening, Becky is amazing.

Becky:
Thank you. I appreciate that.

Steve Larsen:
Yeah, I’ve just been very excited for this. It’s fun to interview everyone, but I was like, “Oh, I’ve got to interview Becky. Becky’s been awesome.” Throughout the rest of the event you were texting me and you were like, “Hey, just following up with you. Have you been doing all your stuff?” I was like, “Man! Normal people don’t do this, that’s awesome.” Anyways, you’ve been working on a lot of funnels, obviously. You’ve been doing this as a certified partner especially for how long? A year and a half?

Becky:
Yes. I signed up for the certification at the first Funnel Hacking Live in May of 2015, and I’ve been working with ClickFunnels since it was in beta, so 2 and a half years.

Steve Larsen:
Oh, awesome. How’d you get into it overall? How’d you get into funnels?

Becky:
I really just kind of fell into it. Some of my clients had been using different things and we were piecing it together. The whole story about piecing all these different things together. I’d been actually doing funnels without the name “funnels” for years and years just trying to get people in and build that relationship. Then a client of mine went to one of Russel’s events or seminars and he said, “Hey, I really wanna try this. Let’s check it out.” From there we just kind of jumped on. Even after I stopped working with him, when he went to travel, I was hooked; completely jumped on board.

Steve Larsen:
That’s awesome. Obviously ClickFunnels’ beta version versus what it is now is very different.

Becky:
Yes, very very different. It was much clunkier, you didn’t have a lot of the drag and drop capabilities, you didn’t have a lot of the editing capabilities. It was still better than anything out there, but a far cry from what it is now with the amazing capabilities that it has to drag and drop and edit and customize. I’m really excited with the changes that are coming this summer, too. That’s going to be even more cool.

Steve Larsen:
Oh, yeah. It’s going to be cool. For sure. Was it because you’d already been kind of doing it that led you to be a certified partner and go through that whole gate also?

Becky:
Absolutely. Because I already had that experience, I already had the knowledge, I was already using ClickFunnels about 60% with my clients at the time, if not more. Just a few of the benefits of becoming certified were enough to tell me that it was really a great thing to do, and in the process i developed this whole new family of partners and colleagues and friends who’ve supported and helped and it’s just been really amazing to have that group of people to support me in growing my business and helping people.

Steve Larsen:
I remember that’s one of the things you had mentioned to me when I was asking questions about it, is just how big the network is when you jump into that boat. I’ve actually really felt that. It’s amazing. I know a lot of people and they’re all amazing. I went through 9 business partners in the last year and a half and they were awesome, but I moved on for certain reasons. Everyone I’ve been meeting is just … They’re all A-players.

Becky:
Absolutely. Absolutely. They say that you draw the people toward you that you need, and I really believe that, particular with this group of people because obviously there’s people in this realm who are not the caliber that you and I have met, but somehow we’ve drawn to us the type of people who we need and who are amazing to work with and supportive and ethical and just not any of the negativities that maybe you’ve experienced before or I have or that you’ve seen out there. It’s just been a great group of people who are willing to make referrals and help out and answer questions.

Steve Larsen:
Yeah, absolutely. It’s not to say that everyone that everyone that I ever worked with in the past has not been good, because especially a few of them, they knock the socks off of what they do, but it’s the … I don’t know what it is. It’s fantastic, though. It’s a cool community that I’ve never experienced.

Becky:
It really is.

Steve Larsen:
It’s kind of funny because whenever you see ads or we all see sales video [headers [spp-timestamp time="00:07:38"] or we all see whatever it is. We all like to kind of puff our chest out and say, “This is what I’ve done and it’s amazing and I’m making this much money,” but beneath it all there’s usually this lifetime of struggle and this lifetime worth of just going against odds that no one else would; a lot of courage and stuff like that. No doubt I’m sure you’re the same with that. I was wondering, what are some of the issues you’ve had with some of the funnels that are now successful that may not have been in the past?

Becky:
It’s funny that you ask that because I’ve been working recently on one that I feel like it’s just a poster child. It’s so cool when everything meshes and it just clicks. I didn’t really start to feel success with this until I kind of was willing to have my own voice to say who I was and use my personality as opposed to try to be a cookie cutter with other people. That’s particular what has made this particular funnel with Alex [Sharfon [spp-timestamp time="00:08:52"], and he said that I could definitely use him as an example.

Steve Larsen:
Do a little name drop. That’s awesome.

Becky:
Yes. It’s really cool because he has had so many successes in the past and these particular funnels were successful, but they weren’t having the type of reach and success that he had hoped for and that he really wanted. You and I met him in San Diego and he just speaks so well to entrepreneurs especially. When he reached out to me and I went up to his office to work with their [inaudible [spp-timestamp time="00:09:27"] for an entire day, the first thing that I noticed was that what was in his funnels didn’t resonate with him. It didn’t have the same language and personality that he has in all of the things that he does through his podcast and his Facebook lives and even just his posts and everything that I’ve seen from him as well as the presentation you gave.

Steve Larsen:
That’s interesting. You’re saying match the personality with the funnel?

Becky:
Exactly. What we did was we went in and we basically stripped out a lot of the industry speak types of things where you might have these specific phrases or you might have these things that other people have used with great success with different markets, but it didn’t fit him and his market. We really made the wording match what his message was and the people that he wanted to reach and the fact that he wanted to build a long-term client relationship with the people that he was reaching out to. He wasn’t looking for a sale, he was looking for that relationship.

Steve Larsen:
How did you create that? You just basically got the whole funnel, or just changed verbiage? How do you match someone’s personality and funnel? I’ve never thought about that. That makes sense, though.

Becky:
Yeah, it really does make a big difference. For him, the very first things we did were take out some of the language and the headlines. We focused on the headlines first because obviously that grabs your attention, and we changed the wording where it was going to reach people. We’re always saying to touch people’s pain points, and so that’s really what tried to do, but in a way that matched his message. Then we went through and we looked at: Are we really showing people how much value they’re going to get from listening to one of Alex’s webinars or one of his products, and we focused on all the ways that this was going to really change their lives. I don’t use that phrase loosely when I come to his particular work, but you and I know it really did.

Steve Larsen:
Oh, yeah.

Becky:
I do this with all of my clients. How is it going to change their lives? I have an iron man client, and what we focused on was: How is this training going to make these people’s lives better? Focus on that messaging in a way that sounded just like she speaks. We looked at the headlines, we looked at what we were offering, and we took out a lot of the things that are purely sales-driven. Like I said, a lot of my clients are trying to build a relationship, so anything that felt too pushy … Maybe some of the phrases and graphics that were really about sales … For these type of people we took out so that they could start to build that relationship and let their audience know that they’re trying to build a relationship and not just sell them a product.

Steve Larsen:
That’s counter-intuitive to what most people do when they’re selling. Does that mean you switch a lot of the things to a lot of soft closes instead of a hard- …

Becky:
Yup.

Steve Larsen:
Okay, interesting.

Becky:
Absolutely. We did a lot of soft sell. Any time that you’re not just about a product, but you’re about a relationship, that’s so important to look at. Are you pushing too hard to build that relationship and turning people off? This is something that the feedback that I actually got was they had had a lot of unsubscribes in the past 6 weeks, 2 months. Once they had started this particular method of marketing because it didn’t resonate with what they were trying to do.

Steve Larsen:
Did you conduct a lot of interviews and things like that to understand his market better, or was he able to pick out, “Hey, that’s not how I would say that.” How did you identify what that is since it’s matching him?

Becky:
Before I went in there, I had looked at a lot of his unscripted work: The things he was doing on Facebook, what he was doing on Facebook live, I watched 2 of his presentations, the live one at San Diego and then the video one, and I do that type of background with my clients in trying to get inside their head exactly the same way they’re trying to get inside their audiences to really understand them better and really understand what they’re trying to do for their audience and how they can do it better.

Steve Larsen:
Interesting. You watch your clients’ social profiles. I never thought about that. That’s clever, though.

Becky:
[crosstalk [spp-timestamp time="00:14:15"]. When their business is reaching out to people on social, then yes I do. It sounds very stalker-ish, and I don’t mean it that way at all.

Steve Larsen:
We’ll call it research.

Becky:
Yeah, it really is. For instance, my iron man client, she had been on several interviews, she had done things outside of social media, so watching her there was very helpful. If I have the opportunity, then I will talk to some of her clients or my client’s clients as well to get that better feedback for how we can better serve them. In a nutshell, it really all boils down to being authentic and finding out what the real message is. Sometimes that takes a little bit of background, sometimes it takes a little bit of research, or really getting to know the person who is trying to reach out to their audience, but it’s so worth it because in the end you are promoting a community and not just a bunch of sales. Like I said before, when I was at Funnel Hacking Live, that’s part of the way that you help people change the world is helping them reach their audience.

Steve Larsen:
Interesting. You’re basically going through and you’re scraping out all the techno babble and stuff that doesn’t make you human; the things that you and I would not normally say in a conversation with each other, and that’s awesome.

Becky:
Exactly. The things that just sound too [canned [spp-timestamp time="00:15:46"] that maybe have been said too often or don’t fit. You can’t fit your particular personality inside someone else’s funnel, just like you can’t fit inside someone else’s shoes or clothing. You just have to make it your own.

Steve Larsen:
I remember on SalesFunnelBroker.com, the site I built and put up, it was kind of funny because the moment I watched it someone was making fun of it. One my buddies, he was like, “You have yourself in a shirt and tie on the front.” I said, “Yeah.” He said, “No one looks at you like a shirt and a tie guy.” I was like, “You know what? That’s good, because I don’t either.” He’s like, “Yeah, if you scroll down you’ve got a big picture of you being all goofy pointing at your shirt in a black and white. That’s more what everyone looks at you as.” I said, “Yeah, I know, I just thought I should toss that in there.” It makes sense, though. It’s not my personality, I probably shouldn’t have that on my front page.

Becky:
Exactly. Especially people who know you, they understand what you’re really like and we just can’t fit inside someone else’s funnel or someone else’s marketing because we need to reach out to our audiences in our own voice and be authentic and sometimes share a little bit of our vulnerability and our background so that they know that we’re real and we’ve been through the same types of growth problems that they have.

Steve Larsen:
Yeah, I am a brass tax really intense guy, everyone. You’ve just got to watch out for me. I will rip your head off.

Becky:
I totally get that about you. I totally get it.

Steve Larsen:
Yeah, most people do. They tremble in fear.

Becky:
Absolutely.

Steve Larsen:
Do you mind kind of walking us through the funnel that you’ve built or fixed with Alex? Is that okay? Just from your perspective I thought it’d be kind of cool to hear, “Hey, on the first page he was getting this percent kind of conversion, but after the tweaks …” Are you allowed to share that kind of stuff?

Becky:
Yes, I actually asked him and he gave me the permission to do so. [crosstalk [spp-timestamp time="00:17:48"]

Steve Larsen:
Awesome.

Becky:
His funnel starts with a free book download, and it’s a really impressive book. The people who were going to it were actually warm traffic, so his numbers should have been really high, but they were in the teens and nobody could quite figure out why he was getting 15, 16, 17%. He actually had several funnels for different reasons, but all that were identical and were all for the free book download, but none of them were converting it higher than 30%. Most of his traffic was warm and these people really liked him, so the first thing we did was look at: How are they drawing people in? It was just very simple; there was the title and there was a very very long description. We shortened that up and we made it a little bit more true to his personality. The other thing that we did was they were asking for about I think 6 pieces of information and we stripped that down to 3. Those particular numbers more than doubled after we made those changes.

Steve Larsen:
You cleaned up the copy and then basically … I call it funnel friction. He had too much funnel friction; he had to release it a little bit before …

Becky:
Right, we just stripped it down a little bit and made it simpler so that people didn’t have to read quite so much, but the impressive thing was going from the second page where they would get the “Thank you for downloading” onto looking at another video. This part that we completely gutted. We took out all the headlines, we took out the slide deck video, we took out the offer- …

Steve Larsen:
On the thank you page?

Becky:
On the thank you page. There was an offer for an upsell and people were even clicking to find out more about it. Those numbers were I believe right around 10%, so really really bad, especially for him for [inaudible [spp-timestamp time="00:20:03"]. We changed it over to be just a video thanking them, telling them what the book was going to give for them, and offering the opportunity to move on with the training with an additional video and more training.

Steve Larsen:
Kind of just like a soft offer but not even an offer; you’re just asking them to progress clicking.

Becky:
Exactly. The thing that I said to them before they shot the video was, “You are not selling to people. You are offering them the opportunity to continue on this journey with what they’ve started to learn, and you’re going to help them even more.”

Steve Larsen:
Interesting.

Becky:
Once he did that, the clip throughs to the third page went up 6 times.

Steve Larsen:
What?! 60%?! Holy smokes!

Becky:
Yes, it was pretty phenomenal. It was pretty phenomenal because that was the most heavily salesy page of [crosstalk [spp-timestamp time="00:21:04"] marketing.

Steve Larsen:
Wow.

Becky:
It was really cool to see that change, that by really dialing into his personality, stripping out everything else, and just giving them the opportunity to continue on, because we weren’t going from sales page to sales page the first time and then taking out the sales the second time. The funnel was the same, it was just the messaging that was different. We had the same offer that they could go on to watch this video and get more training, took out all the salesiness. That was very cool to see that stripping that down, making it really about helping made that dramatic of a change.

Steve Larsen:
That’s incredible.

Becky:
Thank you. Yeah, that was really cool to see. Then on the next step of his funnel which was actually his funnel stack because they were presented this offer a little bit later; it wasn’t immediate. What we did was we took the sales page and we stripped out a lot of the pushiness on that one as well and we told them all the ways that this was going to benefit them and all of the things that they could do in order to continue to improve their life, which is his theme as an entrepreneur. By really telling the audience about what they were going to get and the changes they were going to make before we promoted what the course was going to do, those sales doubled.

Steve Larsen:
Was that an e-course, then? A membership area it promotes?

Becky:
Yes. It was an e-course; a membership area, it had I think 2 payments. It’s within a long-term continuity type of thing, but the offer was the same, the price was the same. The difference was that we added a little bit of graphics so that it wasn’t real plain and boring … The graphics of Alex and of the course … We talked about the changes that it was going to make and then down next to the order form is where we labeled out the ABC of what it was going to offer. When we went in, I believe it was about 8 days after we made those changes, it was so exciting to see that those sales numbers had doubled.

Steve Larsen:
That’s fantastic. I’m a big fan of Perry Belcher, and one of the things that he talks about is how when you start to do a sales letter, or anything really, everyone comes into these scenarios having different beliefs: “Hey, I can do this,” or “Hey, I can’t do this,” or “I believe I won’t be able to because of my past and it’s very very hard to get someone to change their beliefs. What a sales person’s job is is truly more about suspending people’s beliefs long enough for them to purchase, which is the greatest chance of them changing their beliefs in the long run anyways. I think it’s interesting that you said in the sales page you didn’t put the ABC’s of the offer out until way at the bottom and the whole way from the top down to that point, you’re really just pre-framing them to suspend their belief with time. Time is the biggest way ever to suspend beliefs. If they’re out going from the top of the page down to the bottom, there’s more time involved there; more stuff to help them suspend beliefs so that at the end, “Okay, ABC, here’s 2 payment plans,” and you don’t pitch until the end. That’s amazing.

Becky:
Definitely. The top was really about the changes that it would make and it was bullet points. There were very few paragraphs; it was all bullet point to attract the attention and again, to figure out how to help these people realize that they’re continuing on a journey and that this is going to help them improve their business, their life, whatever the case may be that you are working on. It’s about that transformation.

Steve Larsen:
That’s incredible. That doubled the sales right there.

Becky:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Steve Larsen:
Holy cow. People get stoked in the stock market when they have like a 10% gain, and you’re like, “Nope, let’s double it.”

Becky:
It was very very cool to see. The really cool thing about this particular funnel was that the results were so immediate and changes were very obvious. It was very simply, “We are making this for your voice. What would you normally say?”, and these are the results. I’ve only been working with him for I think about 6 weeks. Maybe a little bit more; maybe 2 months, and we’ve seen these types of changes. If you can get these types of changes quickly when you’re really dialing in and he knows his audience, and that’s what’s really fun about working with clients who are established, is that they’ve done the background on their audience and they know their message, so you can really help them transform what they’re saying just by being more authentic. When you’re starting from scratch, it’s so nice to know that these results are possible.

Steve Larsen:
My wife always calls that … Instead of authentic, she just calls it “being real”. We’ll be talking to someone and she’ll be like, “That guy was the most real guy I’ve ever heard.” I used to tease her and be like, “He was real before that.” I get what you’re saying, though.

Becky:
Being authentic is very much a marketing term, but just be true to who you are and be real in your messaging and don’t try to hide behind a lot of things.

Steve Larsen:
Are you allowed to tell a little bit about the membership area also and what he’s done in there?

Becky:
His membership area is phenomenal. He took pieces from a 2 day workshop that he did a few months ago and separated it out and added tools that you can download. Some of it’s very focused on yourself and growing into the entrepreneur, the person that you’re really meant to be. Some of it is focused on growing your business and some of it is focused on growing your business even more with a team. The pieces that he has and the tools that he’s put together just really show how you can take a massive amount of information and break it down via a continuity or a membership area or things like that and offer it to people in bite sized pieces in a way that they don’t get overwhelmed so that they can get the most out of what you’re doing.

Steve Larsen:
What I’m curious about is: How did you determine, besides in the the beginning of the funnel and watching the conversions as you kind of worked down, but how did you even figure out that it was overwhelm that people were feeling?

Becky:
Because I was overwhelmed when I looked at it. I really have to be honest. When I looked at it, I just felt super uncomfortable because it was that pushy. I really believe that we are connected with people for a reason, that God puts people in our path for a reason, and I felt like when I had met him originally that I had so much to learn. Then when I was reading his stuff, I was just very put off. That’s part of the reason why the research does so well is kind of getting to know their personality; you can tell if it’s congruent with what you’re trying to do when you look at someone’s funnel.

Steve Larsen:
Wow. Okay. I’m just thinking. I’ve been taking notes. I’ve got a full page of notes of things you’ve said. I’ve actually drawn out the whole funnel all the way from the back, all the lessons, I number them out. That’s cool. Stu Mclaren, I’m sure you’ve heard the name.

Becky:
Yup.

Steve Larsen:
Stu’s the man, and he loves membership sites; that’s kind of his mojo there. I heard him say once that overwhelm is actually the number one reason someone cancels from a membership site. They get in and there’s too much stuff. People will go in and they’re like, “I don’t even know where to start.” That’s interesting that that’s what you said it was.

Becky:
Absolutely. It was the same thing when I looked at his funnels. They had already broken things down on the membership size and had it in bite size pieces, so now what we’re working on is just making it more user friendly in that membership area because still we want to make the user experience flow. Again, that’s why it’s so important to get to know the person that you’re working with and do a little bit of research on who’s following them and the types of people that they’re going to resonate with. If he were, let’s say one of these people who was hard-hitting and really promoting hard to corporate men and that type of thing, I honestly would step back and say, “I am not the best person to do your marketing because I have no idea what your message is from a personal standpoint.

That’s like what I said before: I really try to work with people that I connect with and who I can help make a difference. If I am nowhere in the realm of your target market, then in order for me to really understand what you’re trying to say, I’m going to have to do way more research with the people that you’re trying to talk to. If you’re in that space where you’re working with someone who they are not targeting, then that’s when the research is really important.

Steve Larsen:
You made all these changes to the funnel itself, I mean 2x, 6x, 2x … I’m just looking down all the numbers: 16 to 32, 10 to- … It’s amazing looking at all of it. In that process, you said that he had been sending warm traffic. Did you guys change the traffic source at all?

Becky:
No change in the traffic source. In the process, we did change the messaging in the e-mails as well.

Steve Larsen:
Oh, really? Okay.

Becky:
We took out some of that hard-hitting sales. It was more his conversational personality, it was an invitation and not pushiness, but he didn’t change his ads, he didn’t change what he was doing on Facebook, and he didn’t send out more e-mails. In fact, ,i think he sent out fewer. Everything that he had been doing on social media were really his voice already. It was really just e-mail and the funnel that we had to change.

Steve Larsen:
Interesting. Okay, so fewer e-mails actually went out.

Becky:
That’s a thing that I do as soon as I start working with a client, is I go in and I subscribe to what they’re already doing if they have something in place. I’ll subscribe to their e-mail and I’ll start looking at it trying to get a feel for their messaging, what they’re saying, how they’re saying it. That gave me that same off-putting feeling in the e-mails that I got when I looked at that sales page.

Steve Larsen:
One of the things that Russel I think does … I’ve never really realized: Some of it’s just for the ease of creation and making things, but it helps him … What I’ve seen him do is he will just record himself teaching something and then go get it transcribed so it preserves everything in his voice and it’s the way he would say it. Most people, the way we write and the way we speak are 2 different languages, but that’s actually an error in sales copy usually.

Becky:
Right, because you’re not going to reach your audience if you are putting on a template, putting on this box of what you’re trying to say. If they’re already following you, then they’re following you for a reason. By following that same type of format that you are engaging them with, then you’re just going to engage them more.

Steve Larsen:
That’s fantastic. I know we’ve been going for a little bit here. I actually have 1 other question, and I’m sure people are going to just kill me if I don’t ask this. How on earth did you get a client like Alex Charfen?

Becky:
It’s really cool how that happened, and it goes right back to my strong belief that you provide the value and the rest comes. He had a funnel that he had put out on social media, and I think a friend tagged me in it. I can’t even remember how I found it, but I ended up coming across it and suddenly there were all these messages that said, “It’s broken, it’s broken, it’s broken, it’s broken.” I messaged him and all the people I could tell kind of were working with him and I said, “Send me your information, I will fix it right now,” and they did and I did. That’s all it was, was just trying to help out. It really pains me to see something like that when there’s something not working and they’re pushing it out to all these people because literally dozens of people were commenting on it that it wasn’t working. Who even knows how many more people didn’t comment on it at all. That was all there was. I said, “Here you go, it’s fixed,” and I don’t know, a month or 2 later, probably 6 weeks maybe, his team reached out to me and said, “Can we talk? We’d love for you to help us.”

Steve Larsen:
That’s so cool.

Becky:
Yeah, it was really neat. They just said, “We appreciate that you helped us before and we wanna see about working with you.” When you are genuinely interested in helping people, good things come to you. It may not be that obvious and that immediate; that was just a really cool experience of it was a pretty tight turnaround and the same person. People are going to talk about you helping them and about the things that you’ve done to improve what they’re doing, and then good things will come.

Steve Larsen:
That’s incredible. Yeah, I completely agree, and I’ve seen that definitely on my own. There was a guy I was doing work for once. I actually … This is kind of how I broke into it, because I needed someone to be able to see what I could do, right? I actually went to him and I told him, “I’m going to build a funnel for you. I know you don’t know what that is, so don’t pay me for the first 6 months. All I need you to do is pay for the tools, I’ll go put it together.” I ended up helping him pull an extra $60,000 from just an e-mail campaign that I put out there with his own list through a sales phone. After that, though, then they offered to pay me, and it was a really easy way to go get a relationship going.

Becky:
Whether or not he had helped you or he had turned around and decided to create it or not, it was good experience for you and you were helping somebody to help other people and so it comes around. All these things kind of click together for good when we’re trying to do something good.

Steve Larsen:
Absolutely. Yeah, and it’s such a counterintuitive thing too, because everyone says, “Oh, put your resume out there and go …” I hate resumes. I don’t have one. You don’t really need one. Anyways, that’s so cool. Thanks so much for sharing that stuff.

Becky:
You’re welcome. It’s a privilege to talk to you and I’ve really enjoyed seeing all the great things that you’re doing, so I’m thrilled to be able to chat with you about it and share some f that experience.

Steve Larsen:
Thank you so much. For all the people who are listening or will listen to this, how can they reach you or follow you?

Becky:
You can find me on Facebook, and then if you want to reach out in a way that’s more direct, I have a website. It’s go.funnelpros.net, and you can see a little bit about me and my history and the story of how I came to be here and a few of the people that we’ve helped.

Steve Larsen:
That’s awesome. Go.funnelpros.net.

Becky:
Yes.

Steve Larsen:
Awesome. Thanks so much, and I am looking forward … I’m going to go check out that site right now, actually.

Becky:
Thanks so much. I appreciate talking with you. It was a pleasure.

Steve Larsen:
All right, we’ll talk to you later.

Becky:
Bu-bye.

Recording:
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The post SFR 7: Interview – Becky De Acetis Shares Her Methods For 6X-ing Alex Charfen’s Funnel Performance appeared first on Sales Funnel Radio Blog.